Talk Box Rock
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Dawn Kasper — Lost Horizon

Last night I visited Dawn Kasper at the Shangri La Hotel in Santa Monica for her performance Lost Horizon, where she welcomed one visitor to a hotel room each hour for twenty four hours. The event was billed as so:

Each performance will be intimate and unique and could include (but are not limited to) watching television, singing a song, reading a book, walking around the hotel, ordering room service, making art, sleeping, taking a nap, telling a story, listening to records, drinking a beer, talking about the history of the hotel experience. No two performances will be alike, and all will take place in a room overlooking the ocean.

I drove through traffic, parked my car, and jogged (I was late) to Ocean Ave, a small wave of apprehension begot me. Should I have brought a comic relief prop? I was the last of 24 visitors, should I have brought coffee? Should I have prepared? But how? What was I expecting? Would she be giving an hour long dog-and-pony-show performance? Would she be clothed? Was I supposed to be clothed?

To give a some context to those last two thoughts, I was sent a text message and asked to show up alone to a hotel room to meet a stranger. I am reminded of Sherman Alexie’s recounting of his would-be-gay-encounter.

I knocked on the door of room 202 and Dawn, who was in high spirits, greeted me. She had some jazz records playing on her portable record player, which she had brought in her four suitcases of belongings with which she cozied the hotel room.

So what did we do? We stared at her hotel room’s amazing window view of the Santa Monica beach. I thought of taking a beach stroll. We unwound from our very different days.  I asked about her prior guests. She mentioned a tandem bath and one masked friend, and that as a whole, she had been playing off the energy of her guests and letting that interaction guide the events of the hour. I talked about my sisters unfortunate New Years visit to Los Angeles. She put on another record.

We gabbed the hour away, and before we knew it, it was 9pm. We never got to walk on the beach like I’d wanted.

As I was headed back to my car, I first thought about how much fun I’d had. I then found myself thinking “how did my experience compare against the other 23 guests and their hours in that room?”

I then reflected on Dawn’s words, that each guest led their hour of events in that room. I realized I’d gotten exactly what I’d wanted at that moment. That was, laying on the hotel bed, decompressing, and lamenting that season 2 of Girls was a letdown compared to season 1.

the view from the hotel room, from Dawn Kasper’s instagram

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I think I’m dyslexic.

three signs I misread, and their originals.

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internet, information removal, clothing, sketch.

internet, information removal, clothing, sketch.

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information removal sketches, set #2

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just an idea i’m playing with.
the city with all the information stripped out.

just an idea i’m playing with.

the city with all the information stripped out.

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Shooting video for Catherine Cabeen’s piece. Turns out these body parts look like an ass. Happy coincidence? I think so.

Shooting video for Catherine Cabeen’s piece. Turns out these body parts look like an ass. Happy coincidence? I think so.

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Found at CVS Pharmacy.

Found at CVS Pharmacy.

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The work of Deedee Berkowitz

The tags

For an interview, I stayed at the most LA hotel, and couldn’t help but notice the art worst things ever on the hallway walls. I commented they were called I have two types of paint. And because a friend encouraged me, and because it’s something I would do, I curated the hotel’s collection. 

I present Deedee Berkowitz, the leading contemporary painter of LA.

Untitled (I have two types of paint.) I

Untitled (I have two types of paint.) II

Untitled (I have two types of paint.) III

Untitled (I have two types of paint.) IV

Untitled (I have two types of paint.) V

And ‘her’ newest work

Untitled (I have two types of paint.) Study in green.


Check it out at the Hotel Palomar on Wilshire in Los Angeles before the cleaning staff figures it out.

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Now hanging at 5th and Lenora.

Now hanging at 5th and Lenora.

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Either (a) the landscaper who waters the sidewalk in Fremont is going to town, (b) some kid is causing some mayhem, or (c) Olafur Eliasson strikes Seattle.
re:olafur eliasson, further reading here http://www.olafureliasson.net/works/erosion.html and here http://www.olafureliasson.net/publications/download_texts/Conversation_HUO_OE.pdf

Either (a) the landscaper who waters the sidewalk in Fremont is going to town, (b) some kid is causing some mayhem, or (c) Olafur Eliasson strikes Seattle.

re:olafur eliasson, further reading here http://www.olafureliasson.net/works/erosion.html and here http://www.olafureliasson.net/publications/download_texts/Conversation_HUO_OE.pdf

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making an art. but I’m in the frame so I am the art. therefore I made myself an art.
QED MOTHAFUCKA

making an art. but I’m in the frame so I am the art. therefore I made myself an art.

QED MOTHAFUCKA

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and two more, more in the style I was hoping.

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got some test footage today for an idea I’m kicking around. this is a still from a video.
gymnastics skillz. I still gots em.

got some test footage today for an idea I’m kicking around. this is a still from a video.

gymnastics skillz. I still gots em.

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At least five times a day, I have to move my eyes away from my computer monitor and look outside so I can remember what true edges and true colors look like. Letting my eyes readjust to the real world brings in to question the more nuanced effects of technology in everyday life.
Are these colors right? Is the monitor backlight just the right hue of white? How do my eyes adjust to the slight blurriness of the virtual representations in my monitor? How does having an image two feet in front of my face eight hours a day affect my vision?

At least five times a day, I have to move my eyes away from my computer monitor and look outside so I can remember what true edges and true colors look like. Letting my eyes readjust to the real world brings in to question the more nuanced effects of technology in everyday life.

Are these colors right? Is the monitor backlight just the right hue of white? How do my eyes adjust to the slight blurriness of the virtual representations in my monitor? How does having an image two feet in front of my face eight hours a day affect my vision?

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